Monday, June 27

Month: February 2022

Zero-Days: The Billion-Dollar Arms Market You’ve Probably Never Heard Of
All Posts, Technology

Zero-Days: The Billion-Dollar Arms Market You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

By: Geneva Bass The market for zero-days began with $10 and a pair of crocodile cowboy boots. In 2002, a Texan named John P. Watters bought the cybersecurity company iDefence for an Alexander Hamilton and the determination to restore profitability after months of hemorrhaging millions.  A zero-day is a computer-software vulnerability. It’s a bug, an undiscovered mistake in code. Its name originates from the fact that once a zero-day becomes known, the code developer has exactly zero days to fix it before it can be exploited. Under the direction of Watters in 2003, iDefence built its competitive advantage on alerting its clients to vulnerabilities it discovered by paying hackers zero-day bounties. IDefence became the first company to publicly offer bounties for zero-days....
Verizon’s 5G Ultra-Wideband Expands Vandy Coverage Following C-Band Deployment
All Posts, Technology

Verizon’s 5G Ultra-Wideband Expands Vandy Coverage Following C-Band Deployment

By: Shane Mumma Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty who have 5G Verizon phones on supported plans may have noticed something new beginning on the second day of class of the Spring 2022 semester: greater access to Verizon’s 5G Ultra-Wideband network across campus. The coveted “5GUW” symbol that was once a rare sight is now a frequent occurrence on my phone while trekking around Vanderbilt. On January 19, Verizon activated its C-Band spectrum of 5G Ultra-Wideband following a lengthy dispute with airlines claiming delays and safety concerns could arise from its eventual deployment. Airlines believed that C-band signals could disrupt airplanes’ radar altimeters, which planes use to detect their altitude—an exceptionally important function when visibility is low.  Following t...
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR: A Few Lessons on Leadership
All Posts, Opinion

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR: A Few Lessons on Leadership

By: Dave Ghosh Picture taken by Aziz Medhioub Dear Vanderbilt, My name is Dave Ghosh, and I have served as the Division Head and Editor in Chief of the Vanderbilt Business Review (VBR) since its inception nearly three years ago. Yesterday, I stepped down from my position, ending what was an unbelievable run and opening the door for what I know will be a remarkable second phase for the journal. As I reflect on my time with VBR, I find myself experiencing mixed emotions. On one hand, I am one step closer to starting a post-college adulthood that surely will be exhilarating. At the same time, I am letting go of an organization that made my time at Vanderbilt special. An organization that defined my time at Vanderbilt. My purpose in writing this letter is not to narrate my ...