Wednesday, October 27

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Why Tech Companies (And Prospective Employees) Should Be Happy About Biden’s Victory
All Posts, Technology

Why Tech Companies (And Prospective Employees) Should Be Happy About Biden’s Victory

By: Dave Ghosh When President-elect Joe Biden is sworn into office on January 20, 2021, many will cheer for a variety of reasons. It may be because the inauguration marks a change in rhetoric on the part of the leader of the United States. Or it may be because people want a different response to the pandemic. Or it may be because they were personally affected by some of President Trump’s policies. There will also be a lot of people who find themselves feeling disappointed; many of President Trump’s supporters bought into his vision of “law and order” and “mak[ing] America great again,”  both which evoke memories of Ronald Reagan. As of November 11, 2020, the results of the election are being disputed, and I acknowledge that. In this article, I do not plan to dive into the conce...
6 Ways to Become a More Sustainable Consumer
All Posts, Sustainability

6 Ways to Become a More Sustainable Consumer

By: Jaime Svinth Consumerism-- we all do it, we all make a living off of it, and, quite frankly, our economy runs because of it. But, it’s 2020, and it’s time to get smart with our consumerism. When it comes to supporting the good of our world- both its people and the environment- we all can contribute, one dollar at a time.  However, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed with knowing where to begin making sustainable choices. For some of us, we have already shifted towards supporting more ethical brands and ditching plastic straws, but, for others, it can be difficult to know where to start. Here are a few easy tips to help you become the smartest consumer you can be: Start Small With so many options and a culture that asks so much of us, a lot of pressure to consume ethically c...
Nuclear Energy: The Bridge to a Cleaner Future
All Posts, Sustainability

Nuclear Energy: The Bridge to a Cleaner Future

By: Trevor Jones When you read the headline of this article, what came to mind? Giant Simpsons-esque cooling towers looming over an indistinct grey building? People’s homes and lives crumbling away because of the Chernobyl disaster? Overly complex diagrams of atoms and blueprints of a maze of machinery? For as long as it has existed, nuclear energy has been cloaked in mystery and fear, becoming a polarizing political issue worldwide. The argument against nuclear energy is more than valid: the looming risk of an accident and nuclear waste’s impact on the environment are the two most common reasons to oppose this source of energy. The benefits are significant, too, as nuclear energy provides a stable, consistent, relatively safe, and long-term cost-effective solution to energy without...
Shunned by the West, Huawei explores alternative paths
All Posts, Technology

Shunned by the West, Huawei explores alternative paths

By: Anton Kozyrev With the ever-escalating trade war with the People’s Republic of China, crackdowns on Chinese companies and entities are on the rise. Technological behemoth Huawei Technologies is no different. Within the past year, many Western governments have declared Huawei an agent of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and have therefore taken strong stances in order to restrict Huawei’s access to broader markets.  In fact, the BBC reported in an October 8, 2020 article by Gordon Corera titled “Huawei: MPs claim ‘clear evidence of collusion’ with Chinese Communist Party,” various European parliamentary committees have continued to assert the existence of links between the CCP and Huawei. This, coupled with forceful tactics and language from the United States, has pushed H...
4 Steps to Beat Climate Change
All Posts, Sustainability

4 Steps to Beat Climate Change

By: Rohan Upadhyay How to leverage the economy to fight climate change How do we beat climate change in a cost-efficient way? Addressing climate change is ethically correct. But people are concerned that jobs could be lost and the debt could grow from throwing lots of resources at the problem. What’s the answer? Liberals support the Green New Deal — a bold proposal to fight climate change and rebuild US infrastructure (among other things) with $16.3 trillion of government investment over about 10 to 15-years. The proposal means well and has some points about how it will pay for itself. But the plan is costly and is not too specific about how it will raise money. The Green New Deal over-relies on government spending. This could cause the debt to skyrocket. Also, once governm...
The Sucky Word “Performative”
All Posts, Sustainability

The Sucky Word “Performative”

Blackstone has recently made a commitment to cut emissions by 15% on investments within the first 3 years of its purchase. For those who are not familiar with Blackstone, it is an investment firm and is one of the largest owners of real estate anywhere on the planet. Blackstone plans to hold itself accountable, by closely charting its process going forward. While this is a big step for a big firm to take, it's certainly been a trend in the investment industry. Organizations such as UBS, Credit Suisse, and Morgan Stanley all have made their own large commitments to having their investment portfolios be environmentally friendly. At first glance, this initiative seems to be great. Blackstone and other investment companies are stepping up to the task of helping with progressive matters. En...
Robinhood Changing the Game for Young Traders
All Posts, Technology

Robinhood Changing the Game for Young Traders

Stock trading was never really a young person’s game; in fact, stock trading was never free, at least not until now. The rise of the smart-phone and the digitization of our lives has changed everything from the way we shop to the way we trade stocks. Ten years ago, it was rare to see 20 year olds trading, now you can ask almost any group of friends and at least one of them will say they know someone trading stocks. Stock trading has opened up to people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and ages for one sole reason: free mobile stock trading. Robinhood is the go-to app for most millennials and gen-Zers, such as myself, who would like to get their feet wet in stock trading. Founded in 2013, Robinhood was one of the first companies to make stock trading free. Meanwhile, other notable tradi...
The Great Moderation: Why Monetary Policy Matters
All Posts, Economy and Government

The Great Moderation: Why Monetary Policy Matters

During the 1970s, the United States suffered from double-digit inflation, rising unemployment, and bleak economic prospects.  Declining domestic industry and increasing global competition sowed the seeds of doubt in American minds and the OPEC oil embargo shook the economy to its core.  The crisis culminated in a period of stagflation, a stagnant economy ill with both high unemployment and inflation.  Monetary policy and the Federal Reserve had failed in both of their mandates: full employment and price stability.  The global monetary order created by the Bretton-Woods agreement collapsed and the US found itself forced to detach the dollar from the gold standard.  However, the world today is not racked by hyperinflation.  The Fed eventually managed to tame th...
Want a Student Loan? Now’s the Time!
All Posts, Economy and Government

Want a Student Loan? Now’s the Time!

The U.S. economy has drastically changed ever since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. Businesses shuttered, teleworking at an all time high, are all part of the “new normal” we are living through. The lack of economic growth has called for the Federal government to enact very low interest rates in order to spur economic growth and prevent an economic crisis like we had in 2008. What do low interest rates mean? The cost of borrowing any money is now extremely low compared to before because the government wants people to borrow money to spur economic growth. This low interest rate includes student loans, which intrigues a large percentage of the Vanderbilt student body. The interest rates on student loans is at a rate of  2.75%, much lower than a typical rate in any other year. Rate...