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The Advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and Its Implications for the Efficacy of GDP

The Advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and Its Implications for the Efficacy of GDP

By: Anton Kozyrev GDP -- or Gross Domestic Product -- has long been the favored means of assessing economic health by myriad groups, from economists to politicians. But it may well be time for a change. According to the St. Louis Fed’s Federal Reserve Archival System for Economic Research (FRASER), the modern concept of GDP was introduced by economist Simon Kuznets, after the United States government had commissioned him to devise a new method of calculating the health of the U.S. economy in a bid to elucidate a clear path out of the Great Depression. This was done in order…
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An Inside Look at the Recruitment Process at Business Fraternity AKPsi

An Inside Look at the Recruitment Process at Business Fraternity AKPsi

By: Jaime Svinth As a university with no undergraduate business school, Vanderbilt leaves many students yearning for the business mentorship, comradery, and networking given at other institutions. Enter: business fraternity student organizations. Delta Sigma Pi and Alpha Kappa Psi are two business fraternity organizations on campus started by students to bring together those interested in pursuing careers in the business world.  Another semester means another pledge class for business fraternity AKPsi, and another chance for business-minded students to join an organization that bolsters their passion.  Here’s a Vanderbilt Business Review interview with recruitment chair Emilio Karakey to give you the…
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How to start investing in the stock market as a college student, and why you should do it now

How to start investing in the stock market as a college student, and why you should do it now

By: Jaime Svinth Whether you have been working since high school or plan to enter into the workforce after graduate school, learning how to manage your money is crucial for a secure financial future. Gone are the days of simply putting money in the bank in hopes that interest rates compound the saved money. Enter: the stock market. Put simply, the stock market connects buyers to public shares of companies. As these companies grow, shares become more valuable, and thus an original investment earns you more money than you paid for it. For some, starting to invest is an intimidating…
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Why Marijuana Legalization Evades Us

Why Marijuana Legalization Evades Us

By: Rohan Upadhyay The debate over legalizing marijuana has become a hot-button and commonly debated issue in the past few years since Colorado legalized weed in 2012. Regardless of one’s personal stance, we should acknowledge that representatives in Washington are not having an honest conversation about how best to reduce drug abuse. The simple truth is that the “War on Drugs” is a product of corruption and didn’t come from actually trying to resolve the drug problem. We must address that, since it began in 1971 under President Nixon, the War on Drugs has not significantly reduced drug abuse in…
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A Changing Global Economy Requires Investment and Support of Higher Education

A Changing Global Economy Requires Investment and Support of Higher Education

By: Anton Kozyrev It would be a gross understatement to say that education has a big impact on individuals’ lives. It is often the defining factor that shapes the trajectory of one’s life, all thanks to the immense financial and economic influences it has. The United States consistently spends more on elementary and secondary education per student than any other nation in the world -- and the U.S. has among the highest secondary school graduation rates in the world. This has undoubtedly been a major factor in the U.S.’ economic growth and development in the past decades. However, as the…
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Despite Struggling Economy, “Everything Rally” Powers Through New Year

Despite Struggling Economy, “Everything Rally” Powers Through New Year

By: Trevor Jones A phenomenon known as the “Santa Claus Rally” is thought to generally bring each year to a close on a bullish note in stock markets, due to optimism around the Christmas and holiday season. In fact, over the last 70 years, the last five trading days of December and the first two of the new year have seen a positive return on the S&P 500 79% of the time. While this has not been as pronounced over the last decade, the principle of holiday optimism still holds true. This year, the year-end rally has been much more…
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From Anbang to Ant Group, the Delicate Balance of Innovation and Regulation in Xi’s China

From Anbang to Ant Group, the Delicate Balance of Innovation and Regulation in Xi’s China

By: Anton Kozyrev Freedom to explore drives innovation. While some may argue over the precise wording, this sentiment generally holds in a variety of circumstances. This phenomenon is seen at a variety of levels within the economy. Google, for instance, has its well-known “20% Time” policy in which it urges employees to spend 20% of their time freely working on new projects. This opportunity to explore has led to the development of numerous noteworthy products, from Gmail to AdSense. Freedom also drives innovation on a larger scale, particularly when it comes to national economic growth. Many proponents of a laissez-faire…
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How COVID-19 Exposed America’s Healthcare System

How COVID-19 Exposed America’s Healthcare System

By: Rohan Upadhyay America can’t catch a break with COVID-19. People stay home to avoid getting sick, so they can’t pay the bills and risk getting evicted. If people can’t stay home, then they’re more at risk of getting infected. And even protesting to change eviction policies puts people at risk of catching COVID-19 as people gather in large groups. On top of that, when people get laid off, they lose their health insurance. Just what you need in a pandemic. Healthcare is tied to Employment — Bad Idea In the US, people mainly get health insurance through their employers.…
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Hong Kong-Singapore Travel Bubble’s Deeper Implications for the Future of the Global Economy

Hong Kong-Singapore Travel Bubble’s Deeper Implications for the Future of the Global Economy

By: Anton Kozyrev In 2003, the SARS epidemic hit Hong Kong – and it hit hard.  Hong Kong would go on to suffer 299 deaths related to the airborne illness – one-fifth of the global death total. This harrowing chapter served as the impetus for a major shift in Hong Kong officials and legislators’ mentality and approach to infectious diseases. The people of Hong Kong became more diligent when it came to illness, with a variety of measures ranging from habitually wearing surgical masks for a cold or flu to comprehensive education on how illnesses are transmitted. These efforts proved…
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